Sunday, August 13, 2017

Bonnie Hunter Trunk Show/Lecture

Last week Bonnie Hunter came to town. For those of you who don't know, she is a famous quilter who does a lot of traveling and teaching of classes. She is a very prolific quilter and makes large quilts out of zillions of tiny scraps. She is the queen of scraps. And she does make lovely quilts! She teaches how to make the small units ahead of time, and she has a special technique which she calls "Leaders and Enders."

I didn't know this, but Bonnie was born in Minnesota and attended elementary school here. Her kindergarten teacher was in the audience!



There was a Show and Tell by audience members. Most of them showed Bonnie Hunter patterns they had used. My cousin, B. showed this one from Bonnie's recent mystery, En Provence. WTG, Cuz! It's beautiful!


Bonnie is a fun and lively presenter. She taught two or three classes while here, but I did not take any of her classes. You can check out her blog and website, and lots of free patterns, at quiltville(dot)com.

Tuesday, August 08, 2017

Book Review: Journey to Iceland

My Journey to Iceland; 10 Crazy Years Later and I am Still Here by Satu Ramo is a book written by a Finnish woman who married an Icelander. They live in Iceland, have a couple of kids, and she tells her story of learning the language and learning to navigate a new culture.
 
This book was fun for me as I had just completed a trip to Iceland, and the book expanded on some of what I had learned. It also mentioned familiar place names and introduced me to new perspectives on Iceland and its people.
 
This was a fun book and often made me laugh. I'm glad I found it at the airport on my way home from Iceland.

Monday, August 07, 2017

Iceland Part Four

(1-5)visiting a national park; the four women are me and three others who are all members of the same guild, Minnesota Contemporary Quilters
(6)a geyser
(7-11)gorgeous waterfalls; see the rainbow?
(11)a salmon ladder

(1-5)a stop at Gudrun's mother's house; she served us Icelandic doughnuts, and then fermented shark followed by a shot of Black Death. Now I can say I've eaten fermented shark, and I can also say I will never do so again.


(1)2:00 AM - it's really not as dark as it appears in this photo. It is just dark enough for city lights to come on. This is from our hotel room in Reykjavik. The Harpa Concert Hall is streaming colors across its front. It's an award-wining and very interesting building that reflects pretty lights off its fa├žade during the day.
(2)a pretty,quilt-like sidewalk in Reykjavik
(3)sculpture along the waterfront
(4)our hotel in Reykjavik

(1-2)Workshop with Icelandic quilters was so much fun. This is four Americans with our Icelandic table-mate, Jona. She gave us each a skein of yarn which she hand-dyed - two with moss and two with rhubarb. I got a rhubarb skein. I must plan something very special to knit. The second photo is one of the Icelanders during show and tell.
(3-4)visit and soak at Blue Lagoon
(5)S.knitting while waiting for our flight home
(6)late addition photo from friend M., is me feeling jubilant after finishing a tough hike

(1-3)During the flight home I had a window seat, and I got this great view of Greenland as we flew over it.

(1)flying over Newfoundland, Canada
(2)modeling my souvenir sweater from Iceland

Sunday, August 06, 2017

Iceland Part Three

Samples of beautiful Iceland scenery along with a cute kid enjoying some ice cream.

(1)B.emerges from a cave which is at the site of this fissure. Water is running inside this cave. (She wished she could put a rubber ducky in the river, and someone somewhere would find a rubber ducky floating along... haha!)
(2)Fissure opened up over time due to earthquakes between the years of 1975-1984. This is where the American plate and the European-Asian plate are separating.
(3)I am standing on both sides of the planet: one foot on the American plate, the other foot on the European-Asian plate.

Members of our tour group doing the straddling of the earth's tectonic plates. - photo by GEG

(1-2)This crater happened during a 1700s volcano eruption. One hundred years later the water was still boiling. Now in 2017 the water is cold.
(3)Icelandic horses are unique. They can do a gait that no other horses do. It is called Tolt (umlaut over the o). It carries the rider in a very smooth ride, no bumping up and down. She is showing that she can carry a full glass of beer during the Tolt, but during a trot, the beer spills all over.

One more post coming -- see Iceland Part Four.